Category Archives: Then and Now

THEN AND NOW: Trash Boom in the Los Angeles River


Here are two pictures of the trash boom at the mouth of the Los Angeles River – one taken yesterday before the rain and one taken this morning.
Workers from Frey Environmental maintain the trash boom in Long Beach. Steve Zieg said that usually by this time of year they’ve collected about 1,000 tons of debris, but so far only collected 150 tons, not including today’s storm.

THEN AND NOW: Jergin's Trust Building, 1986 & 2012

58475-20110214-PN00-THENNOW-JERGENS-OLD.jpg

TOP: View of Ocean Blvd. and Pine Ave. looking southeast on August 13, 1986. The Jergin’s Trust Building is on the right, in the center is the Crocker Bank Building (now the Salvation Army Building), and on the left is Breakers. The Jergin’s Trust Building was named for the Jergin’s Trust oil company, which built a four storey addition in the early 1920s. The Lowe’s State Theater occupied the lower part of the building. In a 1986 Los Angeles Times Article, Tom Welch, who represented the developer at the time said, The project already has cost $125,000 and demolition of the 10-story building will cost another $550,000. “We wouldn’t want to spend that kind of money if we intended to leave bare soil,” he added, in reference to a battle by some to save the building. Photo by Tom Shaw/Press-Telegram

BOTTOM: View of Ocean Blvd. and Pine Ave. looking southeast on February 14, 2012. The Long Beach Convention Center is the low building on the right, in the center is the Salvation Army Building, and on the left is Breakers. Photo by Jeff Gritchen/Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Norwalk's Front Street, 1948 and 2012

57662-20120109-PN00-THENNOW-NORWALK-OLD-JG.jpg

NORWALK, CAILF., USA — The northwest corner of Front Street and Clarkdale Ave. in Norwalk, Calif. on in 1948. Norwalk was founded in the late 19th century but not incorporated as a city unitll 1957.

By 1873, railroads were being built in the area and the Sprouls deeded 23 acres (93,000 m) stipulating a “passenger stop” clause in the deed. Three days after the Anaheim Branch Railroad crossed the “North-walk” for the first time, Gilbert Sproul surveyed a town site. In 1874, the name was recorded officially as Norwalk. While a majority of the Norwalk countryside remained undeveloped during the 1880s, the Norwalk Station allowed potential residents the opportunity to visit the “country” from across the nation.

At the turn of the 19th century, Norwalk had become established as a dairy center. Of the 50 local families reported in the 1900 census, most were associated with farming or with the dairy industry. Norwalk was also the home of some of the largest sugar beet farms in all of Southern California during this era. Many of the dairy farmers who settled in Norwalk during the early part of the 20th century were Dutch. See more Then and Nows>>

THEN AND NOW: Johnies/Bob's Broiler, 2008 & 2011

53769-20110718-PN00-THENNOW-BOBS-OLD.jpg

TOP: Johnies Broiler in Downey , Calif. on March 7, 2008. Johnie’s was a restaurant from 1958 until 2001. From 2002-2006 it was a used car dealership. On Sunday, Jan. 7, 2007 Ardas Yanik began an illegal demolition of Johnie’s Broiler. No demolition permits had been issued for the property. Bulldozers began their work around 3 p.m. Yanik pleaded no contest to three misdemeanor charges stemming from the demolition and had his lease forfeited.
Bottom: The renovated Johnies Broiler, now Bob’s Big Boy Broiler, in Downey , Calif. on July 17, 2011.
Photos by Jeff Gritchen/Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Broadway, 1920s/1930s & 2011

53082-20110621-PN2-THENNOW-BROADWAY-OLD-JG.jpg

LEFT: View looking west on Broadway from American Avenue sometime in the late 1920s or early 1930s. American Avenue is now Long Beach Blvd. Pacific Tower, built in 1923 is at right and the Middough Building is in the center.
RIGHT: View looking west on Broadway from Long Beach, Blvd. on June 21, 2011. At right is the Pacific Tower, built in 1923. In the center is the Insurance Exchange Building Lofts. The Insurance Exchange Building was known as the Middough Building when it opened in 1925. The building was built by Lorne and Way Middough who moved their men’s and boy’s clothing store into the first floor. In 1931, the Middough brothers sold the building, and its name was changed to the Insurance Exchange Building. Photo by Jeff Gritchen / Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Community Hospital Long Beachm, 1930s & 2011

52518-20110527-PN27-THENNOW-COMMUNITY-OLD.jpg

TOP: Community Hospital of Long Beach sometime in the 1930s. The hospital was founded in 1924 as Long Beach Community Hospital with 100 beds and 175 surgeons and physicians on staff. In 1980, the hospital was deignated as a Historical Landmark.

BOTTOM: Community Hospital of Long Beach, which opened in1924 has gone through many owners. Today it is part of the MemorialCare Health System and simple know as Community Hospital Long Beach. The hospital has 536-employee. In March, the City Council agreed to end the city’s lease with Community and start a new lease with Long Beach Memorial for the city-owned building at 1720 Termino Ave., which sits on 8.7 acres. The 20-year lease, which can be extended to a total of 55 years, allows Memorial to take on Community’s needs there, including the $16 million state-mandated seismic retrofit of the building.

THEN AND NOW: Long Beach Earthquake, 1933 & 2011

50692-20110309-PN00-THENNOW-EBELL-OLD.jpg

TOP: The Ebell Club on the corner of 3rd. Street and Cerritos Ave. in Long Beach, Calif. after it was damaged in a 6.3 earthquake that struck on March 10, 1933. The building was built in 1924 as an exclusive social club for women in Long Beach. The building was rebuilt, then rededicated on December 4, 1933. Changes in the building include; a courtyard covered with skylights where it had previously been open air, and the fountain was not replaced.
BOTTOM:The Ebell Club on the corner of 3rd. Street and Cerritos Ave. in Long Beach, Calif. on March 9, 2011. The building was restored in 2004 and now houses 25,858 square feet of event space.

THEN AND NOW: Pine Avenue, the 1930s & 2011

49547-20110127-PN00-THENNOW-PINEOCEAN-NEW.jpg

RIGHT: View of Pine Avenue looking north from Ocean Blvd. in the 1930s. The clock tower on the left, and the Security Building on the right are still standing today. Far in the distance, on the right, you can also see the Farmers & Merchants Bank Building that is also still standing.
LEFT: View of Pine Avenue looking north from Ocean Blvd. on January 6, 2011.

THEN AND NOW: Eli Rodriguez and Jason Gutierrez, 2009 & 2010

46767-20091011-PS12-MARATHON01-JG-THENNOW.jpg

TOP: During the 2009 Long Beach Marathon runner Jason Gutierrez seized up and had to stop in the last miles of the race. Eli Rodriguez passed him and went on to win the race in 2 hours and 27 minutes.
BOTTOM: During the 2010, long after Jason Gutierrez had won the race in 2 hours and 14 minutes. Eli Rodriguez is forced to stop and stretch about 100 yards from the finish line. Rodriguez finished the 26.2-mile race in 2 hours and 40 minutes.

THEN AND NOW: East on Ocean Ave., 1925 & 2010

44247-20100810-PN00-THENNOW-EASTOCEAN-OLD.jpg

TOP:View looking east on Ocean Blvd. in Long Beach, Calif. circa 1925. The FIrst National Bank Building (Enloe Building), with clock tower on far left, and the Security Building, behind clock tower and, the Breakers, right, are still standing.
BOTTOM: The First National Bank building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The original bank building had three stories, which were surpassed in 1906 with the current building. The clock tower with its six-foot-diameter clock face was added in 1907. The structure was designed in a French Renaissance Revival style utilizing pressed yellow brick on the street sides and common red brick on the remaining two sides.

THEN AND NOW: Broadway & Chestnut, late 1980s & 2010

44134-20100806-PN00-THENNOW-BROADWAY-OLD.jpg

LEFT: View looking west on Broadway at Chestnut Ave. circa the late 1980s. This street was the perfect place to find a bail bondsman since it is across from the Long Beach (Calif.) police department.
RIGHT: View looking west on Broadway at Chestnut Ave. on July 13, 2010, in Long Beach, Calif. The new Gallery421 apartment community is on the right.

THEN AND NOW: Ocean Blvd. from Pacific Ave, 1920s & 2010

41649-2010060900PN00-THENNOW-OCEAN&PACIFIC-OLD.jpg

TOP: LONG BEACH, CALIF. USA — View looking east on Ocean Blvd. from Pacific Avenue in Downtown Long Beach, Calif. in the 1920s. Photo from the Historical Collections of Security First National Bank
BOTTOMView looking east on Ocean Blvd. from Pacific Avenue in Downtown Long Beach, Calif. on June 3, 2010. The only building still standing today is the Breakers in the middle of the picture.

THEN AND NOW: Shoreline Drive, 1982 & 2010

41060-20100519-PN00-THENNOW-SHORELINEDRIVE-OLD.jpg

TOP: View looking west on Shoreline Drive from Pine Ave. on October 8, 1982. ORIGINAL CAPTION: Arco towers, second building from left, is one of several new sleek modern structures. Photo by Curt Johnson / Long Beach Press-Telegram

BOTTOM: View looking west on Shoreline Drive from Pine Ave. on May 11, 2010. The rollercoast bridge conneting shops at the Pike partially blocks the view of ‘sleek modenr’ buildings in Downtown Long Beach. The Arco Towers are in the center of the picure. Photo by Jeff Gritchen / Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Ocean Blvd. from the roof of the Breakers, 1975 & 2010

40773-20100511-PN00-THENNOW-OCEANFROMBREAKERS-OLD.jpg

TOP: View of Ocean Blvd between Pine Ave. and Locust Ave. from the northwest corner of the roof of the Breakers Building in Long Beach, Calif. on June 11, 1976. City Hall, center, is under construction. A portion of te Jergens Trust bulding is at left.
BOTTOM:View of Ocean Blvd between Pine Ave. and the Promenade from the northwest corner of the roof of the Breakers Building in Long Beach, Calif. on May 10, 2010. The curved driveway from the Jergens Trust building is all that remains at the southeast corner of Pine Ave. and Ocean Blvd.

THEN AND NOW: Pacific Coast Highway, 1992 Riot & 2010

40267-20100428-PN00-THENOW-PCH-OLD-JG.jpg

TOP:View of East Pacific Coast Highway looking east west near Lemon Ave. in Long Beach, Calif. during the Rodney King Riots in the last week of April 1992. Photo by Cristina Salvador / Long Beach Press-Telegram

BOTTOM:View of Pacific Coast Highway looking east west near Lemon Ave. in Long Beach, Calif. on April 28, 2010.

THEN AND NOW: Aquarium of the Pacific area, 1983 & 2010


40006-20100423-PN00-TEHNNOW-AQUARIUM-OLD.jpg

TOP: ORIGINAL CAPTION ON MARCH 25, 1983: RECREATIONAL VEHICLES lined up Thursday to win prime Grand Prix camping spots near Shoreline Drive. The latest weather forecast calls for a rainless race. For a roundup of pre-Prix activities, se story on Page B1. Photo by Tom Shaw

BOTTOM:View of the backside of the Aquarium of the Pacific on April 23, 2010.:

THEN AND NOW: Long Beach Grand Prix, 1975 & 2010

39756-20100416-PN00-THENNOW-GRANDPRIX-OLD.jpg

TOP – ORIGINAL CAPTION:
TOP CONTENDERS Tony Brise (64, in front), Al Unser (51), Mario Andretti (5, behind Unser) and Brian Redman (1, left of Andretti) hang together in early lap of Long Beach Grand Prix. Redman capitalized on bad luck of other three and emerged as winner of 101-mile race. Photo by Tom Shaw taken on September 28, 1975. (NOTE: The poor grammar in the above caption is exactly as it was printed in 1975)
BOTTOM:The Pacific Coast Club, rear center, is gone, replaced by the Pacific condominiums, in this view of Indy car practice as they drive the street course on Shoreline Drive. during the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, Calf. on April 16, 2010.

THEN AND NOW: Firestone Blvd. in Downey


39289-20100407-PN00-THENNOW-FIRESTONE-OLD.jpg

TOP: ORIGINAL CAPTION: DOWNEY plans renovation of this block-long stretch of Firestone Blvd. This is the south side of Firestone Blvd between Downey Ave and La Reina Ave. on April 26, 1984 Photo by Kent Henderson / Long Beach Press-Telegram

BOTTOM:This is the south side of Firestone Blvd between Downey Ave and La Reina Ave. on April 7, 2010.

THEN AND NOW: Third and Cedar, 1927 & 2010

38878-20100323-PN00-THENNOW-3RDCEDAR-OLD.jpg

LEFT: The First Congregational Church and the Stilwell Hotel (Willmore Building) in 1927 in Long Beach, Calif. The church building was dedicated in December 1914 with more than 2,000 Congregationalists in attendance. It was the largest church in Southern California when it opened.

RIGHT: The First Congregational Church and the Willmore Building on March 18, 2010, in Long Beach, Calif. The Willmore, named after one of the founder’s of Long Beach, was built as a luxury hotel in 1925. Many of the original details of the building have been retained in the lobby and hallways when the building was converted to lofts. In 1880, Bixby sold 4,000 acres (16 km) of the Rancho Los Cerritos to William E. Willmore, who subdivided it in hopes of creating a farm community, Willmore City. He failed and was bought out by a Los Angeles syndicate which called itself the “Long Beach Land and Water Company.” They changed the name of the community to “Long Beach”, which was incorporated as a city in 1888.

NOTE: The writing on the back of the original 1927 print from the Press-Telegram archives referred to the Willmore Building as ‘The Stilwell Hotel’

THEN AND NOW: Port of Long Beach's Berth 34

38062-20100224-PN00-THENNOW-BERTH34-OLD-JG.jpg

TOP: ORIGINAL CAPTION on July 14, 1955:
THE PORT OF LONG BEACH’S newest transit shed, a 73,715-square-foot building on Pier D, has been put into use. The structure was built at a cost of $750,000.
BOTTOM:The Port of Long Beach’s Berth 34 building on February 24, 2010.

THEN AND NOW: Downtown Long Beach Marina and Skyline

36162-20091005-PN00-THENNOW-DOWNTOWN-OLD.jpg
THEN: Aerial view of Downtown Long Beach, Calif. on October 29, 1953. In the early 1920s, the original Long Beach Municipal Auditorium was constructed on the beach and on 20 acres of landfill located south of today’s intersection of Ocean and Long Beach Boulevards. After the construction of the auditorium, there were problems created by storms and coastalerosion. In order to protect the auditorium from these problems, a horseshoe (rainbow) shaped breakwater was constructed around it. Because of its shape it was named “Rainbow Pier”, even though it was actually a breakwater with a road constructed on top of it. The Rainbow Pier went from Pine Ave. to Linden Ave. Just to the left of the Rainbow Pier is the Ocean Center Building which is still standing today. Also still standing is the Breakers (to the left behind the Municipal Auditorium and the Security Building (to the left behind the Breakers).


NOW: Aerial view of the Downtown Long Beach (Calif.) Marina on July 2, 2009, from Airship Venture’s Zeppelin “Eureka”. On the former site of the Municipal Auditorium site now sit the Convention Center, Performing Arts Center and the Long Beach Arena (Whale Building). The water inside Shoreline Drive is named Rainbow Lagoon Park (a reference to the former Rainbow Pier).

THEN AND NOW: Pine Ave. and Ocean Blvd.

34983-20091125-PN00-THENNOW-PINEOCEAN-OLD.jpg

LEFT: Pine Avenue looking north at Ocean Blvd. in the 1940s. The Security Bulding is in the center. A Pacific Electric Red Car is on Ocean Blvd.
RIGHT: Pine Avenue looking north at Ocean Blvd. on November 21, 2009. The Security Bulding in the center is partially obstructed by the Renaissance Hotel. This picture was taken from the second-floor fire escape in the Ocean Center Building.

THEN AND NOW: Downtown Pier / South Pine Ave.

33918-20091029-PN00-THENNOW-SOUTHPINE-OLD.jpg

TOP: View looking north from the Pine Ave. pier in 1925 in Long Beach, Calif. The Breakers Hotel can be seen on the right and the Security Building in in the center, to the right of the pier.

BOTTOM: View looking north from the South Pine Ave. on in 2009 in Long Beach, Calif. The entire area south of Ocean Blvd. was filled in in various stages in the past 70 years.

THEN AND NOW: Security Bank / Gay and Lesbian Center

32885-20091005-PN00-THENNOW-GAY-OLD.jpg

TOP: A new Security First National Bank near Fourth St. and Chery Ave. in Long Beach, Calif. in the 1920s. On September 1, 1868, Isaias Hellman and Francisco Temple formed the banking house of Hellman, Temple & Co., a small bank in Los Angeles that would become Security First National Bank. In 1967, Security First National Bank bought Pacific National Bank and became Security Pacific National Bank.

BOTTOM:
The Gay and Lesbian Center of Greater Long Beach, also known as The Center, on August 26, 2009. In 1985 The Center purchased the 7500 square-foot building.The building was renovated and opened in 1986 as One in Long Beach. In 1997, One in Long Beach became the Gay and Lesbian Center of Greater Long Beach.

THEN AND NOW: Birney Elementary School

30836-20090812-PN00-THENNOW-BIRNEY-OLD.jpg

TOP: Original caption published in the Press-Telegram on June 24, 1951.
READY FOR FALL – Construction of Alice M. Birney School, Maine Ave. and Spring St., is expected to be completed in time for student occupancy when the fall term starts. Six other schools are under construction while working plans are being prepared for two more. The new schools will house 5000 students.

BOTTOM:
Alice M. Birney Elementary School at Spring Street and Maine Ave in Long Beach, Calif. on August 6, 2009. The school’s namesake started as organization called the National Congress of Mothers. The first meeting was held in Washington D.C. in 1897. Over two thousand mothers from all over the country attended the three-day meeting. Birney was the first president of her organization. In 1925, the National Congress of Mothers became the National Congress of Parents and Teachers. The local units of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers are called Parent-Teachers Associations or PTA’s.

THEN AND NOW: Long Beach Freeway (I-710)

31502-20090830-PN00-THENNOW-710-OLD-JG.jpg

TOP: (original caption Dec. 8, 1952)
IN USE WEDNESDAY – This is the section of the Long Beach Freeway which will be opened Wednesday. This view is from the Willow St. overpass looking north on December 8, 1952. Officially known as the Long Beach Freeway, it runs 23 miles north from Long Beach to Alhambra following the course of the Los Angeles River for most of its route. The first section of the Long Beach Freeway opened in 1952; the last in 1970. Originally numbered CA 15, it was renumbered CA 7 in 1964 when work on began on Interstate 15. In September 1983 it was approved as an interstate, and In 1984 it was changed I-710.

BOTTOM: View of Interstate 710 (Long Beach Freeway) from the Willow St. overpass looking north on August 26, 2009. The growth of cargo trucks at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach has added an enormous amount of truck traffic to the Long Beach Freeway, since it is the most direct route between the port complex and the railyards in Vernon and East Los Angeles, as well as the Pomona and San Bernardino freeways. It has also become a major source of air pollution, emanating from diesel-fueled trucks idling in rush hour traffic congestion and giving cities along its route some of the worst air quality in Southern California.
Caltrans and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority have called for an expansion of the segment of the freeway between the San Diego (I-405) and Pomona (SR-60) Freeways. It would include dedicated truck lanes, elevated carpool lanes and up to 10 lanes for general traffic. By using existing right-of-way along the Los Angeles River.

THEN AND NOW: Ocean Blvd. looking east

30896-20090812-PN00-THENNOW-OCEAN-BLDGS-OLD.jpg

LEFT:
View looking east on Ocean Blvd. in Long Beach, Calif. on August 1, 1976. On the right is the Ocean Center building which, built in 1929, still stands today. In the center, is the Jergins Trust Building that was named for the Jergins Trust oil company. The Ocean Avenue side of the building housed the Lowe’s State Theater. On the left is the Breakers which was built as a hotel in 1926. It is now a senior living community. Photo by Bob Shumway/Independent, Press-Telegram

RIGHT:
View looking east on Ocean Blvd. in Long Beach, Calif. on August 6, 2009. The Breakers is on the left and the Ocean Center Building is on the right. The building that appears to have taken the place of the Jergen’s Trust Building is the Salvation Army Building. The Salvation Army Building, built as Crocker Plaza in 1982, is actually east of where the Jergen’s Trust Building was located. Photo by Jeff Gritchen/Long Beach Press-Telegram

THEN AND NOW: Pacific Avenue, Lincoln Park, City Hall and the Public Library

30487-20090730-PN00-THENNOW-PACIFIC-OLD.jpg

TOP: View of Pacific Ave. looking north from Ocean Blvd. in the early 20th. century. Lincoln Park is on the left with the old public library in the center of the park. The building blocking Pacific Ave. is the city hall. In the background, center, you can see the steeple of the First Congregational Church in front of the Willmore Building.

BOTTOM: View of Pacific Ave. looking north from Ocean Blvd. on July 31, 2009. Lincoln Park is on the left. The roof of the public library in the lower left of the photo. You can see the steeple of the First Congregational Church in front of the Willmore Building.

THEN AND NOW: First Street from Lincoln Park

30465-20090730-PN00-THENNOW-FIRST-OLD.jpg

TOP: View from Lincoln Park looking east down First Street in Downtown Long Beach in the 1920s. The Security Building, background on left, and the Metropolitan building are still standing today.

BOTTOM: View from Lincoln Park looking east down First Street in July 2009.

THEN AND NOW: Long Beach Arena / Municipal Auditorium

29802-20090715-PN00-THENNOW-ARENA-OLD.jpg

TOP: View of the Long Beach Arena in 19__. The Arena has hosted various entertainment and professional and college sporting events, including the volleyball events of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games. Entertainers like Frank Sinatra, AC/DC, Iron Maiden, Ozzy Osbourne, Judas Priest, Metallica, Kiss, Led Zeppelin and Grateful Dead have also headlined here. Long Beach Arena was the site of the first National Hockey League game involving an expansion team, as the Los Angeles Kings and the Philadelphia Flyers, both expansion teams, played on October 14, 1967. The Kings won, 4-2. The Kings played in Long Beach for the first half of their expansion season while the Forum was being completed. On the left is the Municipal Auditorium that was built in 1932 that hosted events including Liberace in 1947, and the comeback performance of Judy Garland in 1955. In its heyday, the auditorium held twice as many events annualy then any other in the United States, include 600 free events each year.

BOTTOM: View of the Long Beach Arena in 2009. The Arena The Arena was home to the former Long Beach Ice Dogs team, which played professional ice hockey in the ECHL. The Ice Dogs ceased operations of the team in 2007. Along the exterior wall of the drum-shaped Arena is “Planet Ocean”, one of environmental artist Wyland’s Whaling Walls, which was dedicated on July 9, 1992. At 116,000 square feet (11,000 m?), it is the world’s largest mural (according to the Guinness Book of Records). The mural depicts migratory gray whales and other aquatic life that can be found in the waters off Long Beach. In celebration of Earth Day in 2009, Wyland touched up the existing Whaling Wall and added a large mural of the earth on the roof of the arena. On the left is Parker’s Lighthouse at Shoreline Village and the Hyatt Hotel.

THEN AND NOW: Masonic Temple

29584-20090708-PN00-THENNOW-MASONIC-OLD.jpg.jpg

TOP: The Masonic Temple in the 800 block of Locust Ave in Downtown Long Beach, Calif. in the early 1900s. When the building was in its heyday in the mid-1920s it housed multiple ballrooms, secret passageways and a dramatic theater stage. BOTTOM: The former Masonic Temple building now sits in the middle of the Temple Lofts, an 84 unit condo complex with a north and south tower.

THEN AND NOW: Cock 'O the North

19702-20081118-PN19-THENNOW-OLD.jpg

Scribbled on the back of a print made in 1955 was, “Atlantic Avenue business area.” I guess in 1955 it was, but in 2008… not so much. The top pictures is a view of the 5800 block of Atlantic Avenue looking south on May 12, 1955. The bottom image is today. The only constant is the Gage Pharmacy which is half way down the block on the right (about the very middle of the picture) and the Cock ‘O the North sign on the left.

THEN AND NOW: View from the Villa Riviera

14339-PN20-THENNOW-OLD.jpg

TOP: Visitors at the Villa Riviera Hotel in 1930s Long Beach were treated to this view of Ocean Blvd. looking west toward San Pedro. Train tracks can be seen on the south side of the street before they turn on Lime Ave and steps head down toward the water where the International Tower now stands. Shoreline Drive, which today would be in the lower left, had not been built yet. The lone tall building on the ocean side of the street is the Breakers. Built as a hotel built in 1926, it is now a senior living community. On the far left you can see the Pike roller coaster and the ocean before it was filled in to make room for the convention center, performing arts center, hotel and other buildings.
BOTTOM:The is the view residents of the Villa Riviera Condominiums enjoy looking west down Ocean Blvd. on August 19, 2008. On the left is the International Tower condominiums. The Breakers can still be seen on the left and In the distance is the World Trade Center, center. A parking lot and the Long Beach Arena now sit where the waves once crashed on the shore of the International City.

Then and Now

13963-PN14-THENNOW-OLD-JG.jpg

Another in my series of Then and Now photos. The top image was shot by Tom Shaw in 1953 looking west toward the Breakers Building, right, and Jergens Trust building, center, with Civic Auditorium on the left. The bottom photo was taken August 13, 2008, looking in the same direction.

Photos: Then and Now

We’ve started a new weekly feature in the paper and the name pretty much says it all. Every Wednesday, in print and online, we’ll feature a photo from our archives along side a picture from the same angle shot today. This week is the view from the roof of the main library in Long Beach looking toward the corner of Pacific and Broadway. The old photo was taken in 1978.

11665-PN03-THENNOW-NEW-JAG.jpg